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This is a WAKE UP call! How will you answer it?

This is one of the toughest blogs I’ve ever had to write. To find the words was difficult. I hope that I will serve you with what I am sharing today. It was written from the heart.

Because of my maximized schedule these days, I write my blogs a few days ahead of time. And over the weekend, so my team can take the weekends off, I pre-write Saturday/Sunday and Monday ahead of time so that they aren’t working on the weekend. It’s a beautiful thing to be able to manage, but then life happens.

I have not been able to write a blog yet about what happened in Connecticut – and I really thought about whether I should or not. And the more I thought about it – the more that I felt like I should.

But before I do, I want to start with a prayer:

Dear God/Father/Mother/Source/Spirit/Uni-verse, please help us to mend our hearts from the tragedy in Connecticut. Please help to comfort the pain of the parents who lost their children too soon. Please surround all of those whose lives have been forever changed because of the actions taken by fear and ignorance. There can be no deeper pain than losing a child. Please help our nation to wake up and take action so that this never happens again. Please help us to heal our breaking hearts and please help us, even in this dark hour – to find Love in our hearts for the darkness of the world – for we know that Love is the only power that can heal our world. Amen

It’s unimaginable that something like this could happen in modern times and in America. But it did. And not only our country, but our world has been and will be affected by this for years and decades to come. Because I am writing this blog a few days after there has been SO much covered on the news – I am not going to focus on the tragedy, the details of the crime or any of that.

I feel that the best way for me to honor the children and you, my dear Reader, is to do what I do best – which is be vulnerable, real and share my heart with you.

This moment in time will spark much debate about what is to come. New gun laws. A discussion about mental health. Should we arm our teachers? And finger pointing will happen. Which special interest group is responsible for this? What does the Constitution say and is it up to date with modern times? This is a debate that should be had and that will be had. If you feel called to join that conversation, do it. We need leaders to pioneer the way. Action must be taken. But, today, the conversation I want to have is a spiritual conversation. Of course a spiritual conversation includes action and policy, but that is not what I want to talk about today. It’s not my place because I don’t have the answers. But what I do have is a feeling in my heart that I need to express. And I hope that in doing so, I have served you.

As much as we would like to, we must not hate the darkness. We must not lash back with the same level of evil that visited us.

Spiritual practice counts when the pressure is on. It matters most when we are tested the most. And what happened on Friday is perhaps one of the greatest tests that we as a nation have faced since 9/11.

The question we must ask ourselves – which is the single most important question we can ever ask ourselves is this – what are we going to make this MEAN?

The answer to that question will determine the outcome.

Well, I can’t answer this question for the nation, for the world or for you. But I can answer it for me.

When I look at the actions from last week, what it means for me – is that many people on the planet have forgotten who they really are. Their connection to The Divine, their connection to their community, their connection to themselves is fragmented. And the painful, debilitating grip of separation has its grasp on many people in the planet.

And so, while more laws and more action must be taken – ultimately what will change our planet, not just from events like what happened last week in America, but the events that happen like that all over the world every week – is a shift in consciousness.

Einstein said that problems cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that created it. And it’s time to admit that we as a culture, as a species, are addicted. We are addicted to violence. We are addicted to a fuel supply that is killing the Earth. We are addicted to the illusion of separation. We are addicted to our righteousness. We are addicted to profit. We are addicted to consumerism.

This is not just about gun laws and mental health. This is a wakeup call – a call to see our commonalities and Love each other for them, rather than to hate our differences. This is a call to wake up and see that the world is in pain and that we have the solution through working together, rather than tearing each other apart. This is a call to deepen compassion for a world that is fragmented and has placed personal achievement at the expense of others ahead of the common good. It’s a call to make humanitarian values the bottom line and economic values a secondary motivation.

To me, the action of last week makes me have even more resolve to do my work. And I believe that now, more than ever – with such a display of darkness – that the world needs more Light. More Light from me, more Light from you and more Light from anyone that you know.

We cannot solve this problem and many others from a place of more rules. We need more Love. And that starts with you and me. Imagine what would have happened if poor Adam would have had more Love. If he had been able to feel the joy of serving others; if he had felt special and unique because he was being praised for his talents. Imagine if just one person could have touched him and given him hope instead of despair. Imagine if he had had the tools that we do to change his life.

Imagine how different the world would be. And to make sure that this kind of thing never happens again, we need more Love, more compassion, more giving, more serving – we need to wake up and remember to connect within and to remember that we are all connected. And that the actions of one affect us all, and that actions of all affect the one.

There is no escaping this reality. We shall either prosper together or not. This moment in time is a wakeup call.

What will you make it mean for you?

All my Love,

Mastin

  • Sunshine Bloom

    Good morning Mastin, what happened to the audio. I have to get ready for work, no time to read the blog this morning and I want to read it. Have a fantastic day, I will read it at work :-(

  • michellesears

    Thank you Mastin for sharing your thoughts on this event. And I agree with you 100%. More Love is the only answer. 

  • Beth K

    Thank you, Mastin.  I have been at a loss for the right words. . On Friday evening I found myself getting so upset and voicing opinions I don’t normally voice outside my close friends/family. Getting caught up in arguments it seems was so much easier than feeling the incredible pain in my heart. I can be honest here – When I saw your status update last night, I was worried. I wasn’t sure what to expect from your blog.  I’ve turned to the daily love for inspiration, to learn how to live my life in love rather than in fear, to learn how to forgive not just others but myself, and many other reasons.  I feel so strongly that what is wrong in our world CAN be fixed with love. A conversation with you once brought me the beginning of healing and comfort that I so greatly appreciate and reflect on daily, and I hoped that the people involved in this situation could hear the same.  Your words are beautiful and what is needed right now.  I am so thankful for you speaking from your heart and for saying things that need to be said.

     And with Connecticut being my home and some people who I love so much being directly connected to this, I feel a strong need for compassion here, a respect.  It hurts me to see people attacking each other and insisting their solution is right while people who are directly involved just need space and love to process and even begin to heal.  Our fighting and demanding is not going to give them that and they deserve it. 

    I haven’t come to a complete conclusion what this event means to me.  I know that it means I need to do more..personally, for my children, and for my community.  I know I have more to give, more to share, and I hope and believe I have ways to inspire others to join me.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=535640395 Stephanie Ross

    I’m on board. Good job putting yourself on the line. I’m standing proudly next to you at the forefront. Ready to do what is needed to help spread love, compassion, empathy and understanding in this world.

  • http://twitter.com/30_Days_of_YES Travis Thomas

    Thank you Mastin. The very first thing I posted in response to the tragedy was the need for us to raise the conversation. It couldn’t be about gun policy or blame – we need to go deeper into who and what we are as a culture and society. That seemed to resonate.

    Then on Sunday morning – during my daily listening and meditation – this analogy LEAPED into my head – and instead of questioning – I just dictated. It must not have been me, because it only took about 30 minutes to write. If anyone finds it helpful – please enjoy. I think it matches with your inspiring words this morning :)

    The World’s Greatest Magic Trick!
    http://www.yes30.com/2012/12/16/the-worlds-greatest-magic-trick/

  • Mary6049

    My first feeble prayer was that God would use this tragedy, over time, for good.  At first, we all try to find a single little ray of light in the darkness, but looking back at other horrific events, they somehow give birth to many endeavors that help humanity.  I know the impact of all the lost lives is embedded in all our hearts.  And our love and compassion focused as such is sure to give impetus to change.  At least, that is my faith and hope. 

  • Tabitha M

    Thank you, Mastin, for writing this so eloquently. This is exactly what we need to focus on and bring to the world: our Love and Light. In Peace.

  • Sgshank53

    Thank you, Mastin.  We are all one.  Love is the answer.  Love is all there is.

  • http://www.facebook.com/NicoleMooreNYC Nicole Moore

    Great post Mastin!  I agree this is a call for love.  It’s a clear demonstration that “hurt people hurt people”.  

    Have you read “Power vs Force” by Dawkins?….This world needs to start vibrating at Love or above.  

    Thank you for the work that you do to spread love in this world.  xo

  • http://twitter.com/AskVasavi Vasavi Kumar

    Mastin, THANK YOU for sharing yourself with us. I too, wrote a post that was posted this morning. It was scary and vulnerable for me to share, but then only way I know to make a difference is to speak my truth. http://vasavikumar.com/2012/12/i-am-adam-lanza/

  • Vjhutman

    I totally agree with your message! I posted some similar words on my FB wall last Friday, although not as well said as your post. Friday’s tragedy was truly a “wake up call” to us all but also I am feeling this situation we have now as part of my “calling” to do more. I am considering the options, choices I will take to bring more love and light into this world. With gratitude….

  • Stephanie Harris

    I love this. This is the conclusion I came to with my roommates, with my friends, and with my family. In speaking our truth, in our authenticity, we inspire the world. We are driving change. Because we think differently and have taken the step towards truth, the depth of truth, we have also taken steps into leadership. My friends asked me, “As a leader, how do you feel about this and what do you think should be done?”  And from my heart I spoke my truth. That in working on me and saving myself, I am truly changing the world. That it is time for us to take complete responsibility for ourselves on our path and to do so with compassion and patience. It takes great leaders to speak truth in love. To not blame external things like gun laws (though they are important) they are not the root of the issue. The root of this is responsibility and love. And it starts with us!

  • TrackerM

    Thank You Mastin, I agree with You whole heartedly. We have to work together to make this world better for everyone. More love, more community & support, more inclusion. Society is full of souls who have become separated, we need to find a way to pull them back in to support & love. We need to give hope to everyone even those, in fact especially those who feel they don’t belong. We must return to community.
    Thanks Travis for the article, it say’s so much.

  • James

    I totally agree with the blog today, Love is the answer to quote John Lennon. One has to wonder if these horrible events need to happen to us as a race in order to understand what is fundamentally wrong and what we must do in order to progress.

  • Billie

    Thank you for your kind and encouraging words. Love is the way :)

  • http://letluvrule.blogspot.com/ Kate

    Thank you for writing about love Mastin, it truly is what we need and we all need it, everyone. As a mother of 3 I am horrified, scared and the depth of sorrow continually takes my breath away. As I left my oldest son yesterday in Kindergarten I wept the moment I got into my car,  I had knots in my stomach, it took everything to muster up a smile and leave him when all I wanted to do was to bring him home. I currently struggle between the fear and my heart~ my heart knowing that I must believe and keep fighting for the love in the world, that we can get better and that by staying and living in love my children will learn to love and help make this world a better place. This is all so difficult when I see these innocent faces and want to do everything I can to protect them in a fear and ego driven world. I will stand and fight with you, for Love Mastin. So many souls are in desperate need of true connection, they are in need to be “seen” for good or bad, we need to look up from our electronic devices and truly greet someone from the heart and begin the change now….today.
    Sending Love
    Kate
    letluvrule.blogspot.com

  • Kabushey

    I have been reading TDL for three years now and never have your words struck as deep a chord with me as this article. Beautifully written from your heart. And I agree 100%. Love you. Keep up the beautiful life-saving work you do…

  • Patti

    Although I agree with your message I strongly disliked your writing this morning – it read like “spiritual entertainment”; sometimes a heartfelt message needs to be conveyed simply, and this did not do it for me.

    • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

      Take what resontes for you and leave the rest! :o)

  • LMH

    Thank you for addressing this incident.  I look to your blog each day for inspiration and am honest when I say that the last few days seem to have shaken my faith in all that is good.  Normally someone who can see the positive side of every situation, I am really struggling to find any good in this horrific tragedy.  However, after reading your comments this morning, I whole-heartedly agree that the world needs to come together to love eachother now more than ever.  Perhaps that is the lesson.  Thank you for reminding me of this.

  • Gina

    Thank you so much Mastin.  We are on the same wavelength (and thus connected).  Below I want to offer a simple exercise I shared with my small group of readers this morning.  I offer it here in the hope that it might be helpful to many more.  It is for the purpose of connecting us with the same God energy that is in all of us, the God that loves everyone…everyone.  I believe, as you articulated in your blog, this love and healing power is available when we connect to it, not unlike how electricity is available only when we put a plug in.Hi Friends,How do we make sense of tragedy?  How do we heal from sadness, rage?  How do we know what our truest essence, the God within us, feels?I don’t know the answer for sure but I know we can ask something very powerful…and then simply notice what comes.So ask…Dear God, open my heart wide so I may allow the feelings that connect me with you to pour in.  Then just breathe and be still…  Don’t rush it, don’t force, simply relax your body and mind and let what happens next. This is not about resisting dark feelings.  It’s about inviting the Light to enter and sooth them.Now in your stillness, notice what you feel.  Does peace, compassion, forgiveness, love begin to seep in?  If even the tiniest amount do, thank God deeply.  Then be still again. Do those feelings grow?  Give thanks again.What more comes?  Do you begin to feel inspired towards any action, even the most subtle…perhaps to simply think more compassionately about someone you have not or send love towards another with just your thoughts.  Give thanks again and do whatever you were inspired towards.  Notice once again.  Does the Light get brighter?  Give thanks again.This is what I believe aligning with your higher self is and in times of unimaginable grief and disillusionment, I believe it’s how we receive what we need to heal.  May our heavy and broken hearts lighten and mend,                                  

  • Ronda

    The only part of your blog I have issue with is the “…poor Adam…” part. I agree with the bulk of your message and I feel I understand the big picture and how we have to find the good in the darkness, but I can’t feel bad about having no symptahy for this boy. Some things are just too terrible even if it is all in God’s plan.

    • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

       If we cannot Love those that we hate, we know nothing about Love.

  • http://www.are-you-there-kathleen-its-me-god.blogspot.com/ Kathleen Reynolds Chelquist

    I wrote it a few days ago, and I will write it again. And again. And again. “BE THE CHANGE YOU WISH TO SEE IN THE WORLD.” Ghandi. This is the only way. There was a time I scared myself with my son. Yes, I said it. My 4 year old son. I hid in my room, locked the door, and tearfully prayed-more like begged- for help. He was in uncontrollable rages, and I feared  a knife would be in my back by the time he was 7 if I did not do something. And, quick! God delivered. My earth angel, Cinnamon Lofton, scooped me up on her wings of love and helped me….look at myself. I needed to be the change. I needed to change my, “WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU MENTALITY!” I needed to get out of fear and stop projecting my worry, stress, and angst. I did. I still am. My story is too long to tell, AND you can read it on my blog if your heart leads the way. Well, maybe you will be reading it on THE DAILY LOVE. Thank you to Mastin, Liz, and team for giving me the chance to be a CONTRIBUTOR!!! I am so grateful to help you on your Love Mission. OUR Love Misssion.  

    The Daily Commenter, 
    Kathleen Chelquist
    are-you-there-kathleen-its-me-god.blogspot.com/ 

  • CJ

    I will honor the lives that were lost by being more compassionate and loving to everyone I come in contact each day.  They paid a very high price to teach me this lesson and I will not let it go unrecognized.

  • Martha

    Your article was perfect, and it resonated greatly with me. Those thoughts are in my heart also. I am so torn about something in my life, and I would love some response. I have started a Peacemakers Movement on a small scale, hoping to enlarge it when I retire from teaching, which I had hoped I’d do at the end of the year. Right now the movement consists of bracelets and a card with the acronym PEACEMAKERS on it and what that looks like. For instance, P stands for PRACTICE KINDNESS, and so on. I give these to people for free, hoping they’ll follow the words in their every day lives and wear the bracelet as a reminder to think and be peaceful. As spiritual followers, do you think this could help the United States now? Do you see a place for this? I’m willing to tust the Universe to take care of my needs. Any ideas on this? If I get to travel around, I want to hold Peace Walks, and some other things. The money from the walk entry fee would go just to local charities. Comments?

  • Heathereden

    Mastin, I couldn’t say it any better… This tragedy has had me really upset and thinking about what I can do to change the world. I have my legitimate story on what keeps me completely busy. My children are the light of my life, and I can imagine the pain those parents feel. My mom lost her son at 14. That was a horrid moment in our lives, and the pain never goes away. It evolves into whatever you make it to be: anger, sadness, grief, or eventually peace and passion to make life better. Pain is the conversation I had last night with a friend after reading more about the killers motive. Pain inward results in suicide. Pain outward results in mass killings. How do we effectively deal with pain? I think that is our mission to figure out how to effectively deal with pain. It must be recognized and dealt with appropriately or the consequences lie ahead. As a teacher, my method of dealing with a child who gets their feelings hurt by another child is to help mend hearts immediately. We must deal with things as they come up. We can’t let ONE heart go unnoticed or forgotten. Everyone matters on a deeper level. The happening in Connecticut was a horrible replay of the Grinch who stole Christmas in my opinion. The day was cheerful; everyone was celebrating Christmas and they were happy. Then comes the outcast to destroy the love. It’s a chilling lesson…. It is time to join hands in community so that not one heart is left out. The era of ostracizing people for differences is over. So, will the world end Dec. 21st? Yes, I believe the world as we know it will end. A new era of consciousness is rising. Thank you.

  • Rashida

    Mastin, I was with you until you wrote this:  

    “Imagine what would have happened if poor Adam would have had more Love. If he had been able to feel the joy of serving others; if he had felt special and unique because he was being praised for his talents. Imagine if just one person could have touched him and given him hope instead of despair. Imagine if he had had the tools that we do to change his life.”

    This is great general advice for how to treat people in your life in general, but it’s a mistake to assume what Adam needed, and if he even would have taken any help.  Mental illness is a real thing (and that may or may not have been his issue), and there’s still so much we don’t know, and so much uncharted territory.  Your advice is wonderful in terms of getting to know the people around you and realizing when someone needs help and reaching out to them, but assuming a course of action is right without any investigation is pretty close to taking the wrong course of action.

    • Marqymarq86

      It’s that thought that perpetuates the problem we face. Any time an individual believes in love, but not its ability to conquer all and change all is when we take steps backwards.

      I’m with Mastin 100% on this one. Adam Lanza needed to feel love. The lack of love in his life does not excuse or condone his incredibly poor choice. But, I choose to believe that, if he had ever felt the joy of serving others, and been praised for who he was and WHERE he was in his life that tragedy would not have happened. In my opinion, it takes a person with no experience with the power of love to stare an individual in the face, no less a child, and pull a trigger.

      • Rashida

        I agree with you to a point. I was trying to say that we’re assuming that no one showed Adam Lanza any love, no one ever praised who he was, and that he’s never felt the joy of serving.  How do we really know that? From the media, we only know about 0.005% of his life and who he was. My point is, if we assume what someone else may need, and that showing love and support is all that is necessary to help someone, we might be under-helping.  We need more data. 

        Sort of like, if someone cut their elbow and you applied neosporin on their arm – he’s still bleeding and may scar.  Now why would you put neosporin on his arm when he cut his elbow?  Maybe you couldn’t see it because he covered it; maybe he lied to you; maybe he’s in denial that he needs any neosporin.  

        A loving action that is misdirected is not harmful, but it may not be helpful. 

        • Thelindzzz

          Mental illness can be a very scary thing and it becomes much easier for people to isolate an individual and treat them in a certain manner than it is to be committed to doing the hard work of finding them help and supporting them to see it through (love).   Do we know enough about this guy to say that all he needed was love?  No.  He needed love applied the right way, and towards himself. 

          We do not know enough about this young man.  I am from this area of CT and know first hand there are also a lot of drug problems, heroine specifically, and perhaps there is something of that at play.   No one wants to talk about that or paint that picture of quaint little CT.  My mother worked at the hospital where some of these kids were born and has seen people abandon newborns in dumpsters and diners.  It is not wrong to say this a sleepy, precious area of the country (it’s really lovely!), but it has its problems too.  And in describing it in this way just makes it easier for people to feel more hatred.

          But Mastin is 1000% correct.  The answer to this call is love.  Regardless of how often or much it had been offered to him.  When is it okay to stop applying love in the right way?  And we must apply that as individuals and as a nation in exploring this problem.

          • Beth K

            I’m sorry but I feel strongly that the facts should come out before any decides who needed to do what differently. I want badly to argue here and can’t. This part of Ct is all the beautiful things its described as but we are talking about people and none of us spent 2 seconds in their lives.
            And I know someone who knew this guy & his family. Unless you know facts first hand, not you read or the media said so, the hurtful things being said are unnecessary righ now. Let facts come out. Only God can judge.

          • Tucker Tanja

            I am curious…what do you mean “he needed love applied in the right way?” 

        • Ken

           Love the entire discussion. I had almost the exact thoughts as Mastin. Granted we dont know it all but it was a small tight knit community and there was trouble finding anyone that knew this kid. Anyone. No friends. No connection. It was like he was invisible. All anyone could say was that he was very quiet and kept to himself. Mental illness or not. Gun control or not. We live in a world when a 20 year old can go through life with that little connection. I am in no way justifying his disgusting actions, but you have to assume a life like that is extremely painful. Not to mention this disconnect, isolation, and loneliness does seem to be a pattern in many of the perpetrators of these tragedies. That being said I think it is safe to say whether a few people reached out or not, not enough people did.

          Reach out. Connect. And not on Social Media. In person.

          • http://www.facebook.com/jamileegrassi Jami Grassi

             Beautiful.  Done with social media and going to connect in person.  Signing off…

        • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

           I’,m not suggesting that no one showed him Love, but what I am suggesting is that this could have been prevented if someone could have helped with the fragmentation. Love is not just “support” Love is tools, Love is help, Love is a soul to soul connection. Love is seeing someone. These things, in my work with hundreds of thousands of people is far more healing than anything else.

          • http://www.facebook.com/jamileegrassi Jami Grassi

             Love does not prevent someone from hearing voices (i.e. my brother) when they are so severely mentally ill and “God” telling him to hurt others. Even medication doesn’t completely stop this.  Love from parents who have the knowledge and dedication in the most difficult of situations (most mentally ill are so difficult parents give up.  not because they don’t love, but because they are overwhelmed.  it is not the parents fault.  we need society to ‘love’ and help them with this incredible burden.  it is too much for one parent to handle.  my situation was unusual.  my parents were advocates, very strong and made sure my brother was in a place, sadly for them, a psych institution, which overwhelmed them with grief and guilt, but kept the world safe). But i saw the toll it took on them.  My mother NEVER was the same after my brother was diagnosed with terminal mental illness.  Just like any mother with a terminally ill son.  She loved her son.  And, I love my brother. But love alone will not cure my brother. We need better understanding of what mental illness is.  It is very complicated.

          • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

            Jami, I understand and feel you. Love is so misunderstood. Mental illness in most cases is a person’s best way to cope with reality. They get segmented, fractured – and do everything they can to meet their needs. And this response has a major impact not only on their psychology and connection with Spirit but with their biochemistry. It is a VERY deep and still emerging conversation – and the mental science is still very new. I know that you, your parents and everyone reading this blog is doing the very best that they can to meet their needs and to be the bests version of themselves that they can. This includes your brother. He, too – is a perfect Soul doing the best he can to meet his needs. Being labeled as “ill” does not help, being put in an “institution” is not ideal. There are better, more Loving, more evolved ways to help – and THAT is what I am talking about. The journey is about becoming integrated – whole – self actualized and to do this we must really look at how our labels and process for helping people with fragmented personalities and biochemical imbalances. Love in the form of awareness, wiser knowledge, more compassionate care where we stop looking for pathology and instead make it an intention to restore holistically the mind/ body and spirit – these are the ways that LOVE can help.

            Love is much more than en emotion. It is much more than a feeling. Love is ACTION – Love is a verb. Love that extends beyond the duty of family, to the duty of society and how whole medical model.

            When we honor people, Love them and give them the tools of the mind, body and spirit to re-integrate – miracles happen. THAT is the Love of which I speak.

          • Rashida

            Yay Mastin!  THAT is the kind of specificity we need.  The answer to every problem is always to bring more love to it, but we need to know more about the problem in order to know how to operationalize it, to put it into daily practice.    

            This conversation is so great, and what I see from it is this:  every single person on here is bringing LOVE to the table, but it’s everyone’s unique brand of love that will make the difference.  Mine happens to be mixed with science and data. 

          • http://www.facebook.com/jamileegrassi Jami Grassi

             What also needs to happen is more funding for mental health research into the pathology and how we can help these folks.  If you know about ‘deep’ psychiatric illness, a normal, wonderful child, in their late teens and early twenties, when the brain if in it’s final formation (can’t remember which part of the brain right now), something goes awry in their circuitry.  And, unfortunately, more often in males, one of the side effects is violence.  Then, we medicate them, lock them up and forget about them. It is not simply not being able to cope with reality and circumstance.  I think that is what is misunderstood by those that are not familiar with DEEP mental illness.  And the families are left with guilt for passing the genetic defect to their child and for not taking better care of them.  I invite anyone to go to a psychiatric hospital and see how these mentally ill people live, who, out of no choice of their own, have a terrible
            illness (with stigma attached) and are institutionalized.  I don’t know how much we can ‘fix’
            them.  Scientists are working on it.  There has been research happening for as long as I’ve been around (55 years) and then some.  But it will take much scientific
            research.  And, it is a societal issue as well.  People don’t talk about it because of the stigma that somehow it is something that they caused or could’ve prevented.  That is what I’m afraid you are saying Mastin.  Because this is not the case in severe mental illness.  It is a brain “defect” or malfunction.  I have lived with my brother my whole life and I have been involved in NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally ILL), I’ve talked to brain scientists and mental health professionals and I know this.  I’m not saying Love in the form of Action is not needed.  We need to be very, very sad and very, very angry for action to take place.  Then, what action do we take.  We channel the anger and sadness into meaningful action.  And, for me this Love Action means educating people on what Severe Mental Illness is, not a choice or preventable by any other means, but figuring out how, when our children turn 18, 19, 20, 21 we can prevent that ‘malfunction’ to occur.  I have a dvd that was made about my brother and two other mentally ill families.  It was made 25 years ago and is amazingly current today.  It is called INTO MADNESS.  I will make a copy and send it to anyone who is interested.  Thank you for this conversation.  Love!  And OM.

          • Beth K

            Thank you for clarifying that. I didn’t think you would mean it the way it was being taken.

          • AnahitaJoon

            Love is seeing someone! Love is seeking to understand another! YES!

        • http://www.facebook.com/kitegirlcoach Annabelle Drumm

          That’s no reason to not offer a loving action though. Keeping to ourselves, ignoring those who need a word of encouragement, failing to offer a helping hand when it’s blatantly needed. This is a global, self centred problem and one that is about to change in a big way. Best way to get that change started is to take action today. Look in your own community for those who need help. You may prevent a potential suicide or homicide and not even know it.

    • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

       Rashida – Love is always the answer. Always. In my work with hundreds of thousands of people – I see patterns. Every body needs Love, every body needs purpose, everybody needs to feel like they are important and a valuable memeber of society. Every body is doing the best they can from their point of view with the tools they have to meet their needs and cope with reality. Love is the answer. I have seen miracle after miracle after miracle happen when we look to honor the depth of someone’s soul and give them real – practical tools to not feel fragmented from themselves, their community and their creator. There is no greater Love than giving these tools to everyone.

      • Beth K

        Self love is lacking in so many people. How do we help people when that is the issue? How do you reach out & teach self love, it seems like a person has to ask for it.

      • Rashida

        I believe this is true for 99.99% of people.  But I believe there’s a cohort of people we just don’t understand right now – people with urges that they can’t explain (pedophiles), or people that lack empathy, remorse and have total disregard of anyone but themselves (psychopaths and sociopaths) – we need to learn more about them when we’re trying to help them.  Love is probably the answer for these people, but how?  Do we hope that they can help themselves?  The first thing we need to do is take away the taboo of talking about these things so people can open up about their experience.  That’s one loving action we can take. 

        • http://www.facebook.com/mastinkipp Mastin Kipp

          Love is the answer 100% of the time :o)

    • Sueolsen6

      I don’t think Mastin was assuming anything.  The sentence began  with the word imagine.  All of us could use a little more love, a little more encouragement, a little more Light in our lives, including Adam.   Don’t over think or over analyse the power of LOVE.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/4JGGSAVTV6GZNUZNDGYZK75XCY Zoraya

      I am with Mastin also! Love can conquer all; as long as we allow it to and believe that it can.

    • momof2

      I agree that mental illness is complex. Love is the answer but so is tackling severe mental health issues that some people face. I think as a society we shy away from this.

      I have a son that has behavior issues. This is extremely difficult at times because I love him so much and try to support him in every way. He still makes bad choices and says aggressive things.

      I don’t know if I could love him anymore- we are connected on a soul level. I love him but I am also fearful when he says things or does things that are socially unacceptable. 
      I try to teach him what is right, to make good choices-but my messages don’t always get through

      Maybe we need more love but mostly we need MUCH LESS FEAR.

      We need less fear of people with mental health issues and we need to find more holistic solutions for healing. As a society we need to provide more services and solutions for families that struggle with these issues. That sould like a good place to start showing more love. 

  • Dävid La Rosa

    What left is there when all else has failed? Love. It is the one infallible, sempiternal, unbounded truth and wanna know what the best part Is? It costs nothing! Love to you all.

  • Tim_Custis

    Amen to that Mastin well said! Only hurt people hurt other people.

  • zestoflifeandlemons

    Yes, we need more love.  I have volunteered for years in elementary schools and am astounded by the number of children I encounter who are obviously starving for love and attention.  It breaks my heart to see children that young looking for what they know is missing.  They are growing up damaged in spirit and the parents who are trying to deal with the pain of their own lives are too preoccupied to see it.

  • Jules

    I have always felt that unless the mind has peace this type of horror will continue to happen.  We do not know what was going on inside the mind of this person who did the most horrific act to innocent little  children and their teachers.  But one think is certain He did not have Peace of Mind.  We think we know others so well but it’s time we start to know ourselves better.  I have watched a bit of the news of this tragedy and by all accounts he had a loving Mother and he showed no signs of violent behaviour.  But behind the closed doors of his home we never knew  what went on, as we don’t know what goes on behind the closed doors of anyones homes. Only our own.    It is said that our attitudes toward ourselves are more complicated than our attitudes toward others.  I keep those who are suffering through this in my prayers and I also pray that we all start to look inward to love ourselves more.  It is only with this light of love that we have with ourselves that will take us out of the darkness.  

  • Nona

    Great insights. Mastin. Thank you for the courage to broaden your readers perspective on those horrific events. I am with you here – it is not about fingerpointing or gun control… It is about us, our human core and spirit. It is about how much we have deviated from our true loving essence as a society, nation, race, so that tragic figures of Darkness keep sending us their evil reminders.. Yes, we must look deeper into our own Shadow side and start healing ourselves and others with LOVE. Until we are able to do that, no amount of Forgiveness would wash our souls clean. 

  • Theresa Bierek

    Dear Mastin,

    Thank you… I hope this blog reaches the president and that he is as moved and touched as us readers. Humanity needs to come first, and this truly is a wake up call. This is the most heart opening, moving blog about something we so desperately need to face… It has been very difficult for me to even face this tragedy, and I appreciate you making the decision to write about it, and to truly speak your heart on how important it is for us all to work together in Love to make a shift in this world that will help to spark the light in others as well that are in the dark… Thank you again and I will be sharing this with everyone I can. Connecticut has the word connect in it, and I feel that through this experience we are all connected and affected and can help to change our world for the better. 

    Theresa

  • Sarah

    What a great perspective on this subject. This world is so cunsumed with money, power and curruption we don’t see humanity anymore. My hope is we will wake up and be more aware of compassion. I agree on your view point and where it comes from, the LOVE. My heart aches everyday at the way society views human life. We can’t even pass another person on a street or in a store and smile and show one bit of compassion just for that persons exisitance. We have so much depression and we wonder why. We have no human contact with each other.  It doesn’t have to be in a physical way, 1 kind word a smile, some form of achknowledgement is all it takes to change the course of someones day. Who knows maybe thier life. I have so much flooding my mind to even write. I seem to always consume the heartbreak for so much grief and hurt I see. I want to hug everyone and say just stop the hate, I feel as if I’m being torn apart. God give me strength and bless everyone and send as much love as possible to us all. Great post Mastin and I am grateful for your words finding thier way to me. It’s is such a needed outlet for me at this time in my life. Thank you for your LOVE.

  • Sunshinenbloom

    Thanks Mastin. I am in total agreement with everything you’ve said. What it means for me is to show more love to EVERYONE I come in contact. Yes this is a “call to deepen compassion” and it begins with me. Again thanks Mastin for sharing your heart with us.

  • NH

    Beautiful post! 

    As we are talking about Love in the world, not just in America, I feel that everyone should read this article and be aware of what is going on in the world.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/dec/17/us-killings-tragedies-pakistan-bug-splats

    Much love to all.

  • Anna

    Thank you Mastin for your bravery and eloquence in addressing this. Your words are touching, healing and insightful and what many of us need to hear right now.

  • Jami Grassi

    HI
    Mastin:  I have been reading your blogs for about a year now and am a big
    fan.  Thank you for your heartfelt words today.  Thank you for the
    prayer.  A beautiful prayer I will share. 
    I strongly believe that what we need to do as human beings is to look inside,
    feel the sadness and anger, then channel that into peaceful and loving
    action.  As the president said, “Meaningful Action”.  I wish it were as simple as offering love.  Love is a powerful, potent and a key
    ingredient to our relationships, with ourselves and with others in our lives,
    especially those that we have difficult relationships with or disagree with
    (for me, this is right wingers and gun advocates).   I don’t know about
    Adam’s family, but I know my family’s story.  I am almost 55 years old and
    have a 53 year old brother with severe mental illness.  He and I are both
    the product of very loving parents.  My parents, especially my mother,
    praised both of us, told us how much we were loved, how proud she was of
    us.  She always told my brother how proud
    she was of him as a healthy young boy/man and what he accomplished.  She told him as he has fallen deeper into the
    throes of mental illness how proud she was of how he handled himself when he
    lived with the burden of mental illness. 
    My brother is a good human being. 
    I see him offering random acts of kindness often.  But, my brother just wasn’t as lucky in the
    gene pool.  When my brother was in his twenties, he hurt my dad, several
    times.  (hit him…thank God he only used his hand/fist and it was ‘just’
    my dad).  Still makes me tear up when I remember this.  My dad, who was the most amazing, loving
    parent (hated guns and violence) spent every Sunday with his beloved son, even
    though it was difficult and not fun much of the time.  My dad (and mom)
    adored my brother and myself.  After years of trying to fix my brother and
    doing EVERYTHING they could to make him better, they had no other choice but to
    hand his care over to the state.  Since
    his late twenties, my brother has lived in a state psychiatric facility and
    been a ward of the state.   But, unlike
    most residents in a state facility, my parents and I stayed involved in his
    life.  He is on a lot of
    medication.  He still hears voices sometimes.  Yes, voices.  He
    has told me that God told him to
    hurt his dad.  Crazy, huh?  That is
    severe mental illness. When my brother is upset, he doesn’t understand, like
    most of us, how to handle his anger.  I took him to a baseball game last
    year and we waited for 4 hours during a rain out.  I couldn’t stay as I
    had an evening obligation.  I found out later he was very angry about
    leaving the game and the rain out and told his doctor he wanted to hurt
    someone.  He did not hurt anyone, but??? At least he has doctors and me to
    talk to and I regularly communicate with my brother’s doctors and staff.
    Thankfully, he does not have and never has had access to guns, exposure to violent
    video games, etc.  I told my husband after Friday, that could’ve been my
    brother, many years ago.  Tears.  My parents have passed (dad 7 years
    ago, mom 4 years ago).  My mother lived with deep guilt and VERY DEEP
    SADNESS over this horrible illness, and I know my dad also lived with the
    sadness too.  They were advocates for NAMI (National Alliance for Mentally
    Ill).  I have never been more proud of my parents than I am right now.
    Since this last horrific event I have decided to take more meaningful
    action.  To honor my parents memory and those that have been affected by
    this tragedy (especially the parents/families of the victims and all of the
    families who have mentally ill family members) by getting more involved with
    NAMI. I am very involved in my brother’s life, which is unusual for families
    with mentally ill members as severe as my brother.  But I have vowed to do
    more.  I vow to tell our family’s story,
    increase awareness of mental illness and reduce the stigma of mental illness in
    our society and the guilt on some parents who have mentally ill children (they can’t
    fix it, it was their genes that they passed on, etc.).  I would also like
    to see gun control legislation and will advocate for that.  I vow to work on healing any relationships
    with my family, friends, my community and those I disagree with and to continue
    to be loving in my relationships as best as I can.  I cannot stand by and
    witness yet another mass killing.  This
    was the last straw.  Beautiful babies
    lost and parents who will never see their children graduate, get married, etc.   And I do agree Love is critical. 
    Without the love of my parents, my brother would not have the life he has,
    which isn’t much compared to you and me and most.  But he has his
    cigarettes, he has a bed, he gets warm food (except after Hurricane Sandy), he
    has his sister who loves him and spends time with him when she can (I live in California)
    and a staff who cares about him and keeps him and the world safe.  Thank
    you for this forum.  Thank you for the amazing work you do.  I am so
    grateful!!!!

  • Ashley

    Mastin, you are so inspiring! I read TDL every morning on my phone before I get out of bed and it has become something I look forward to as a part of my yoga and meditation morning routine. Thank you for all that you do and inspire in others and myself. 

    I especially loved the words you shared today. The prayer you wrote consists of the words I was trying to find and I could not have said it any better. I completely agree that the world needs to deepen its compassion – we have become so blinded to personal contact with all the distractions of technology that the recent generations have forgotten the power of a simple smile to passersby and truly meaning “I love you” when said. 

    Keep writing and keep inspiring :) you rock!!

  • Jami Grassi

    HI
    Mastin:  I have been reading your blogs for about a year now and am a big
    fan.  Thank you for your heartfelt words today.  Thank you for the
    prayer.  A beautiful prayer I will share. 
    I strongly believe that what we need to do as human beings is to look inside,
    feel the sadness and anger, then channel that into peaceful and loving
    action.  As the president said, “Meaningful Action”.  I wish it were as simple as offering love.  Love is a powerful, potent and a key
    ingredient to our relationships, with ourselves and with others in our lives,
    especially those that we have difficult relationships with or disagree with
    (for me, this is right wingers and gun advocates).   I don’t know about
    Adam’s family, but I know my family’s story.  I am almost 55 years old and
    have a 53 year old brother with severe mental illness.  He and I are both
    the product of very loving parents.  My parents, especially my mother,
    praised both of us, told us how much we were loved, how proud she was of
    us.  She always told my brother how proud
    she was of him as a healthy young boy/man and what he accomplished.  She told him as he has fallen deeper into the
    throes of mental illness how proud she was of how he handled himself when he
    lived with the burden of mental illness. 
    My brother is a good human being. 
    I see him offering random acts of kindness often.  But, my brother just wasn’t as lucky in the
    gene pool.  When my brother was in his twenties, he hurt my dad, several
    times.  (hit him…thank God he only used his hand/fist and it was ‘just’
    my dad).  Still makes me tear up when I remember this.  My dad, who was the most amazing, loving
    parent (hated guns and violence) spent every Sunday with his beloved son, even
    though it was difficult and not fun much of the time.  My dad (and mom)
    adored my brother and myself.  After years of trying to fix my brother and
    doing EVERYTHING they could to make him better, they had no other choice but to
    hand his care over to the state.  Since
    his late twenties, my brother has lived in a state psychiatric facility and
    been a ward of the state.   But, unlike
    most residents in a state facility, my parents and I stayed involved in his
    life.  He is on a lot of
    medication.  He still hears voices sometimes.  Yes, voices.  He
    has told me that God told him to
    hurt his dad.  Crazy, huh?  That is
    severe mental illness. When my brother is upset, he doesn’t understand, like
    most of us, how to handle his anger.  I took him to a baseball game last
    year and we waited for 4 hours during a rain out.  I couldn’t stay as I
    had an evening obligation.  I found out later he was very angry about
    leaving the game and the rain out and told his doctor he wanted to hurt
    someone.  He did not hurt anyone, but??? At least he has doctors and me to
    talk to and I regularly communicate with my brother’s doctors and staff.
    Thankfully, he does not have and never has had access to guns, exposure to violent
    video games, etc.  I told my husband after Friday, that could’ve been my
    brother, many years ago.  Tears.  My parents have passed (dad 7 years
    ago, mom 4 years ago).  My mother lived with deep guilt and VERY DEEP
    SADNESS over this horrible illness, and I know my dad also lived with the
    sadness too.  They were advocates for NAMI (National Alliance for Mentally
    Ill).  I have never been more proud of my parents than I am right now.
    Since this last horrific event I have decided to take more meaningful
    action.  To honor my parents memory and those that have been affected by
    this tragedy (especially the parents/families of the victims and all of the
    families who have mentally ill family members) by getting more involved with
    NAMI. I am very involved in my brother’s life, which is unusual for families
    with mentally ill members as severe as my brother.  But I have vowed to do
    more.  I vow to tell our family’s story,
    increase awareness of mental illness and reduce the stigma of mental illness in
    our society and the guilt on some parents who have mentally ill children (they can’t
    fix it, it was their genes that they passed on, etc.).  I would also like
    to see gun control legislation and will advocate for that.  I vow to work on healing any relationships
    with my family, friends, my community and those I disagree with and to continue
    to be loving in my relationships as best as I can.  I cannot stand by and
    witness yet another mass killing.  This
    was the last straw.  Beautiful babies
    lost and parents who will never see their children graduate, get married, etc.   And I do agree Love is critical. 
    Without the love of my parents, my brother would not have the life he has,
    which isn’t much compared to you and me and most.  But he has his
    cigarettes, he has a bed, he gets warm food (except after Hurricane Sandy), he
    has his sister who loves him and spends time with him when she can (I live in California)
    and a staff who cares about him and keeps him and the world safe.  Thank
    you for this forum.  Thank you for the amazing work you do.  I am so
    grateful!!!!
     

  • Gaylaforgaia

    Mastin, this speaks for me also.  The changes that will come in the form of political actions, new laws, and new safety measure need to come from a clear, conscious, centered place inside of us all.  The process of engaging in the discussions to form the basis of our actions must therefore be geared towards those three aspects.  How we care for the mentally ill and the laws around their care are in urgent need of conscious, loving attention.  The way our society gives free reign to violent media in movies, tv, commercials, advertising, and daily life destroys the culture from the inside (at the level of subconscious thought) out.  My personal response is to create a teaching to help people eliminate all types of violent media.  Downer tv and ads that follow downer, violent tv shows promoting medicine for depression with side affects like suicide and death?  Seriously?  How about ads for yoga, meditation, nature adventures, nutrition classes, and public service announcements sharing info on the latest mental health well being classes being offered?  How about turning down the volume on guns, cops, lawyers, criminals, dead beats, murders, and other dark misfortunes in tv shows… and insulting tv shows…  There is a lot of work to do to make a significant shift to the underlying factors causing the mass shootings this year… let the centered, clear, calm hearts take the lead in helping us all to wake up to what actions we take next.  Peace to all.  

  • http://twitter.com/alyson_laura Alyson Laura

    From my skin, I feel we are putting too much attention on this singular event. I agree it is distasteful and sad, but it is a drop in the bucket when our highest role model condones and participates in the same violence. 

    Did you know that President Obama’s drones have killed over 100 innocent civilian children in Pakistan this year? Do they not deserve the same love?
    http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/category/projects/drones/

    We need change at every level, AND it can start with each individual.
    So as I say my prayers, I bless my family with love and joy, I bless ALL children with freedom, safety, comfort, and I send intentions for lightworkers all over the world to be successful in raising their vibrations and the vibration of the whole Earth.

  • Glenna

    It is a wake up call, as you say. Out of every darkness is the opportunity for more light. It is up to us to take that opportunity up and make it our priority.  I am touched by your post and by your words. 

  • Lisa

    Makes absolute and perfect sense! Thank you……just thank you.

  • Maryerm

    Beautifully said mastin. I echo this sentiment and pray for our massive healing. I share my own blog post in Love- https://thelovegardenersblog.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/our-great-learning-wisdom-from-confucius-and-the-tragedy-in-conneticut/

    May these children not have given their lives in vain- that we wake up to our individual and collective responsibilities to LOVE!

  • Krystal Rain

    I totally agree Mastin. Yes, it is true we do not fully know Adam’s life story. However, is it not obvious that he did not receive the true love that he may have needed to prevent this horrific event? It was not love that drove him to do it. I completely agree that this is a wakeup call. Our country has been getting wake up calls for quite some time now. They are not happening so we can continue to use these tragedies as political platforms, but so we can look internally and love ourselves and essentially love others. (Share our light) A change is coming. A shift in consciousness. We can either join in, or continue our self defeating behavoirs that prevent us from truly feeling the love that we are meant to feel :) Blessings.

  • Keikorush

    thank you Mastin

  • Jennifer

    Mastin,  I love what you wrote… all of it.  I think for me, and hopefully others, the message is that we need to put our kids first.  Whether we are looking out for our kids, your kids, and each others kids, we need to make them a priority over everything else.  Kids are more important than gun control, animal rights, terrorism or drug wars.  Kids are the most precious and vulnerable creatures on earth and this is a calling for us to recognize that. 

    Let’s put our political opinions aside until our chilren are protected, cared for, fed and loved.  Let’s give mothers and fathers the courage to ask for help when their children need more than they can offer.

    Children are the light of our world, they are innocent and good.  It’s time to put them first.

  • Srose

    Wow!  This is what my heart has been trying to express these past few days too.  While it might be necessary (?), and we shouldn’t be content to sit back and do nothing, it’s frustrating to see the back and forth and finger pointing that is going on right now.  Our society needs change, but change on a grander scale than more access to mental health care and more gun laws will bring.  I truly hope that this is a turning point and a wake-up call.  

    And yes, it is hard to feel compassion for Adam Lanza.  He did a horrible and god-forsaken thing.  But, you are correct, Mastin, in that the best we can do is be love and emulate love.  Hate does not cure hate.  

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/4JGGSAVTV6GZNUZNDGYZK75XCY Zoraya

    I got that from what you wrote. Well said Mastin. And I do not in any way see how love could not be helpful to anyone.

  • Kathy Niell

    Truly awesome!

  • Cynthia

    Well done Mastin, bless you for the work you do…

  • Yiota531

    Thank you for this post Mastin. These are my thoughts exactly. I hope to be able to make my small difference in this big world…

  • Toni

    I have been reading your blog and getting your inspirational quotes for about almost 6 months.  You writing today spoke to so many of my thoughts that I have been aching to express.  I just wanted to thank you for helping us to grapple with our confusion, and feel our feelings.  One the many issues in our lives is the imagined necessity to numb out from the pain of the world.  In order to be compassionate and learn how to truly love, we must learn to feel our emotions and process them in creative and artistic ways.  Grief is probably the toughest emotion to manage and lives underneath our anger and indignation.  Once we can feel, we can then find compassion, but it is not easy task to process our anger and grief.  Thank you again for reminding me to live my mission.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/John-Styn/556455716 John Styn

    Bravo, Mastin.  It is so tempting to find a cause , make it an enemy, and then go to war with it.   But healing 

    “…ultimately what will change our planet, … is a shift in consciousness.”You said it, brother.

  • Natalie

    Well said Mastin. The world needs more light and love. That’s the bottom line. 

  • Cathy Ladd

    Yesterday I felt the grief of everyone as I drove to work. Including all the people that placed the  flags at half mass. Grief was there and i felt isolated wanting to heal. Isolated and unable to send my love to the world’s heart, to let everyone know that I am with you somehow.

    Then last night at a store I saw a man that was on oxygen,  in a wheel chair, and very frail looking. I wondered if he was isolated and filled with grief. I usually don’t try and make eye contact with people I don’t know, but not now. Our eyes met and I sent him my warmest, most sincere energy (yes love). To my surprise it was returned with the most beautiful smile filled with the same energy (yes love). 

    Love is the answer.

  • Incognito

    How can we preach love without looking at the big picture… the world.  USA is not my center of universe. There is much worse violence going on in the world. Aids and Famine in Africa. Drones in Pakistan. Civil war in Syria. Massacre in Bahrain. Salve drivers in China.

    Lets start feeling when it happens anywhere in the world and not just in N. America.  

  • Sufiyo

    Thank You Mastin!  Such a refreshing, insightful and yes, loving, response.  Just what the masses need to hear indeed…  And my hat off to you for having the courage to say it in such a tense time of grieving and no doubt anger. Really.  And, the question is, how to get those that need it the most to accept this love?!  I’d add that we need to start by (as cliche as it sounds) TRULY, humbly, deeply accepting and loving ourself :)  Then we have somewhere to give and love from :)  And then, as new parents, we can create a new generation of well-adjusted, balanced, spiritual light beings :)  Until then… awareness, self-awareness can be seen as only for the hippies. Things (and everything within our illusion of time) are shifting however…  Thank You for being one of the believers and torch barers Mastin :)

  • Project More Love

    I love you, and I thought this was beautiful and well done.  xox I truly believe that More Love is needed for us all.

  • tc

    Mastin, I just read this now…cannot believe all the comments received, it’s always difficult touching on perceived controversial issues, good on you for having the courage to bring this up, I hope all of this does not effect your day in a bad way.

    I reflect on what you have said about love when I look back on my own life & life experiences. There is no doubt that a lot of my problems would not have occured had I have received ‘love’ in the active sense, so I went on a roller coaster ride until I was able to heal myself. Knowing this, & looking at myself in both my dark & light sides, I can honestly say that I agree with you on your statement on love. Because I see myself in just about everyone, the mentally ill, the different sorts, I know longer want to run from it all. The chemical imbalances, the mind body soul connection, it all has a meaning. Will the world ever reach this place of balance? I don’t know but I will certainly try to make a difference despite the darkness but nit everyone is capable if that is what I believe, not everyone is kind, or giving. I’d love to do something wide scale to help.

  • Aboogies2000

    Martin, I do agree with you on your points.  We do need to Love more.  There is so much hate in this world.  As we come into this world as a child born, they don’t have hate, bigotism or things like that.  The children are taught by their parents.  Not all people should be parents.  We don’t have a book given to us when we have children.  Most people are into money, possessions etc.  We also need to lower the cost of health care on all fronts, so that one is able to seek help.  My daughter took her own life when she couldn’t deal with things.  The State of California had guardianship of her and they failed her.  They had her on 17 different meds to find which one would work for her problem.  The State just dopes them up and send them on their way.  That sure didn’t work out so well, did it?  I as a parent of someone that had mental issues, that came on from being jumped by 3 boys, that robbed her.  They took her spirit away from her.  Most therapists need their own therapists.  She tried to work things out but after 5 yrs she couldn’t do it no more.  May she rest in peace. 
    God Bless all the ones who lost their lives to another person with a weapon (any kind).

  • Andrea

    Thanks Mastin for putting this most difficult experience into words that can heal.  I agree that at the core of all the problems we are experiencing in our world today, whether personally, nationally or globally is the total disconnect that occurs when there is so little self-love and love for others being fostered in our lives.  I couldn’t agree more that LOVE is the answer and it starts with each one of us individually emerging and living the love that we are!  Thanks again for all you are doing to facilitate love in our world.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=593421474 Cecelia Fresh

    Awesome post, Mastin! Here are my thoughts I’ve been “collecting” since last Friday.

    Guns don’t kill people. People kill people – Is a reactive
    statement to a societal epidemic that we cannot possibly begin to wrap our
    heads around/comprehend.

     

    My belief is that it is a justification at it’s best. An
    attempt to oversimplify the situation at hand, and natural reaction for many
    who cannot begin to process a senseless act. A canned statement.

     

    First…let me be clear about what a gun is – it’s a weapon.
    It’s a piece of machinery that is made of metal to destroy. Whether the subject
    it’s designed to destroy is a human or an inanimate object is not the issue –
    the issue is…it’s destructive instead of constructive or creative.

     

    We are currently living in a time of mass destruction and
    decomposition. When a society feels as if they need to take their safety into
    their own hands by way of possessing a weapon – it is a reactive response based
    out of fear. Not of love. A response filled with fears such as: being afraid of
    the unknown; of the heightened uncertainty that we all are facing – as the
    current systems, and infrastructures of our society are in the midst of
    crumbling. We tend to gravitate towards the familiar and likeness of our own
    existence. We don’t feel comfortable with what we do not recognize. It’s foreign.
    It threatens us. Therefore the immediate response of many is to tend to react
    out of fear instead of love.

     

    This tragedy in Newtown, Massachusetts is one of many
    instances where a human carried out their fears in a compartmentalized fashion.
    They actually saw this as the best option in order to deal with their fears and
    isolation, confusion, separation and lack of feeling or receiving love and acceptance.
    To simply label people as being “evil,” or having a “mental disorder/illness”
    is the same as disregarding that they are human – or not
    acknowledging/validating them – but instead labeling them and placing them in a
    separate category as us. It is an issue of somewhere along the line; society/we
    missed the mark. It is a turning point. A major turning point – where perhaps
    society/we have the opportunity to get it right; to teach love, connection, and
    confidence as a reaction to uncertainty and change – instead of fear,
    separation and isolation.

     

    In this particular case, instead of a mother giving love to
    her son, and maybe a hug to validate his existence during these challenging
    times we are living in – she instilled fear – quite possibly from her own
    doubts of existence. She encouraged him to shoot a weapon as a means of defense,
    and as a reactive fear-based response to resolving their feelings of insecurity.
    Some of the weapons she legally obtained and possessed in her home are very
    powerful semi-automatic, assault rifles – in addition to handguns. Though I’m
    pretty sure she didn’t have the events that took place on Friday, as the
    outcome. She clearly felt very threatened to build such an arsenal. So it begs
    the question – what kind of outcome did she have in mind? In my opinion, therein
    lies the disconnect.

     

    It is gut wrenching and beyond sad that families in our
    society must face one of the deepest grief’s a human might possibly know – the
    loss of a loved one in a senseless act of violence. And, particularly, during a
    time where many people in our society are celebrating the Holiday Season, which
    is typically identified as one filled with joy, peace, happiness and love.

     

    So – where do we go from here? Does this become yet one more
    thing where we give our acknowledgment that it was such an awful thing to hear
    about, and take pause for a brief moment – only to get on with our lives as
    usual – or is it a true mark in time where real change, and transformation is
    made? Where no more fingers are pointed at who is to blame, and no more
    statements are made to justify what just took place. Where we realize we are
    all connected, and in this together. We are all responsible for – and to – one
    another. We are all extremely affected by what took place not only on Friday in
    Newtown, Massachusetts, but in Portland, Oregon; Aurora, Colorado; Virginia
    Tech, Virginia; and Columbine, Colorado, just to name a few.

     

    We all are in the midst of processing and embracing this
    grief – and it is my hope that we, as a society look toward a future with a
    heightened sense of healing, love, peace, and creation in our daily rituals/routines.

     

     

     

     

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000392107784 Anita Richards

    always ~ unconditional love ~ always

  • Angel

    Outstanding post, you have said everything that I have been feeling! I love that you are in this world to give me the perspective that I need.  Thank you!
    With Love,
    Angel <3

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1464583297 Listening Heart Kim

    Thank you for sharing this heart felt and inspiring words ♥

  • Shelly

    Yes, I agree so deeply. While rage and grief are a needed part of the process, I am committed to focusing on Love as a way to improve the lives of anyone I can reach. I believe this to be far more likely to succeed than the reactive punishment model that hasn’t been working very well at all.

  • Lucinda

    Mastin, Thanks for what you wrote. I agree that more love is the answer. I’m still weeping over the tragedy. But, in the words of a friend of mine, everyone involved in that incident were volunteers, not victims. Lots of people don’t understand that statement. Tragedies like the one in Connecticut, keep happening. Why? because we’re not asking the right questions and looking at the real issues of how to stop such events from happening. I think more love of ourselves, and everyone we meet is a great place to begin. That’s not the easy path to take. I won’t go on. I’ll just say that I was deeply touched by your comments. Thanks.

  • Druiz Dmr

    Mastin, you make more heart happy…thank you for your healing words. Olove you tot he moon and back, Delphine Ruiz

  • Sandranord

    A forensic psychologist was on The View.  He said we need to stop focusing on the shooter because we already know what the profile is.  He fits the profile.  We have known about these profiles for years.  We need to stop searching for answers there.  His was a wonderful look into what needs to be done.  He said, when you see someone isolated, reach out to them.  I couldn’t agree more.  Many of us tend to shun others who are different, or quiet.  All healing comes from love.  A kind word or gesture can bring people feeling isolated out of that isolated state.  As a person who had isolated myself as a child, I ached to have someone reach out to me and just talk to me.  The more I was isolated, the worse my feelings of alienation became.  I was lucky and found a wonderful therapist.  So please, let us all show kindness to those who are different from us.  Love is always the answer.

  • Diane

    Well said

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=736879384 Chrissy Harmon
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=736879384 Chrissy Harmon

    I respond by teaching kids emotional intelligence The CLueberry Book “Louise Hay for Kids and also….as a former military spouse I believe we END. THE. WAR. ON. FEAR. http://clueberries.org/2012/12/20/end-the-war/

  • Jenniferolden

    Mastin,
    I understand what you are saying about love being the answer, but I think the unintended consequence of your statement is that for people with severe mental illness or family members of those afflicted, the message is: If you had just loved better, then your brother, son, wife, or mother wouldn’t have suffered so profoundly.  Family members almost universally blame themselves anyway and so you are likely to meet defensiveness and hurt.  So the tricky part is how to give your advice without blaming.  I imagine that what would help might be for you to describe a time when your love failed, or at least that’s how it felt and how you can still believe that love wins.  That would help me to trust you and your wisdom… Warmly, Jen Olden

  • Lori

    As a teacher, I can assure you that a teacher somewhere showed Adam love and kindness, and as a mother, I can also be pretty certain that his mother showed him love and kindness.  She was probably just overwhelmed with his troubles.  Kids are very unkind and we must teach them about kindness and serving others.  Their words overrule the words of an adult through the teenage years and its their words we need to change.  Parents and teachers can model for their children what it means to serve others, instead of, or along with competitive sports and activities. 
    We also need more studies on Autism and the Autism spectrum disorders and mental illness in children, because those populations are growing rapidly and being diagnosed more regularly.  There needs to be more support for families of children with these disorders.

  • Sam

    I loved this:  Einstein said that problems cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that created it. And it’s time to admit that we as a culture, as a species, are addicted. We are addicted to violence. We are addicted to a fuel supply that is killing the Earth. We are addicted to the illusion of separation. We are addicted to our righteousness. We are addicted to profit. We are addicted to consumerism.

  • AnahitaJoon

    Mastin, It’s my first time on this site and I feel no accident that I read this blog first.

    Thank you for taking a wider perspective approach to a discussion that very much needs the Spiritual perspective.  

    We are all in this together indeed!!! Adam needed Love and so did his mother, we have no way of knowing how our society failed HER and HER SON. There is no OTHER. They are are us and we them! that’s the thing!   

    I believe even if we are not all aware of it, in large this event hurts us deeply, because we feel the betrayal of our souls and the death of another piece of innocence we would very much like to hold onto.  

    But you are RIGHT it is to serve as a wake up call to see the darkness and to own it, it is not out there it is within each of and only by shining the light there on the darkness are we freed to live the brilliance that we are.

    Namaste Brother Mastin!

  • Mystic Mandy

    Amazing blog. I agree. We’ve lost appreciation for whats sacred and how to love. When love is more actualized in the world, more than just in superficial thought forms, we will see evidence of it through the sacrifices and changes we can make that can protect our children, the environment and everything else that is living and which deserve our respect and love. Too much focus on loving the inanimate, movies, television, illusions, etc and calling that abundance. Not enough focus on recognizing the abundance all around us and cherishing it in what lives and is full of beauty (including Nature and our children). It corrupts mankind externally and internally and separates him from the truth of what he is (as he is caught up with and addicted to favoring only what is inanimate, unnatural and man-made).